Denebola luminosity

Certain commercial concerns offer to "name" stars for individuals—at a price. These star "registries" have no official sanction. Astronomical objects are named by the International Astronomical Union, according to internationally agreed-upon protocols which do not permit naming stars for living persons. Stars rarely get names these days, but catalog numbers But while you cannot legitimately name a star for yourself or a friend or family member, we invite you to observe a star whose light is as old as you are, or they are, and to possess a photo of it if you like. Like the night sky, it's free!

In 1856 Norman Pogson , noticing that photometric measurements had established first magnitude stars as being about 100 times brighter than sixth magnitude stars, formalized the Hipparchus system by creating a logarithmic scale , with every interval of one magnitude equating to a variation in brightness of 100 1/5 or roughly times. Consequently, a first magnitude star is about times brighter than a second magnitude star, 2 brighter than a third magnitude star, 3 brighter than a fourth magnitude star, et cetera. Based on this continuous scale, any star with a magnitude between and is now considered to be sixth magnitude, a star with a magnitude between and is fifth magnitude and so on. With this new mathematical rigor, a first magnitude star should then have a magnitude in the range to , thus excluding the nine brightest stars with magnitudes lower than , as well as the four brightest with negative values. It is customary therefore to extend the definition of a first magnitude star to any star with a magnitude less than , as can be seen in accompanying table. [10]

Denebola shows a strong infrared excess , which most likely means there is a circumstellar debris disk of cool dust in orbit around it. [18] As the solar system is believed to have formed out of such a disk, Denebola and similar stars such as Vega and Beta Pictoris may be candidate locations for extrasolar planets . The dust surrounding Denebola has a temperature of about 120 K (−153 °C). Observations with the Herschel Space Observatory have provided resolved images, which show the disk to be located at a radius of 39  astronomical units from the star, or 39 times the distance from the Earth to the Sun. [19]

Denebola shows a strong infrared excess , which means there must be a debris disk of cool dust in orbit around it. [ 7 ] As our solar system is believed to have formed out of such a disk, Denebola and similar stars such as Vega and Beta Pictoris may be good candidate locations for extrasolar planets . The dust surrounding Denebola has a temperature of about 120 K (−153 °C). Unsuccessful attempts have been made to image the dust disk, implying that the disk contains much less material than that surrounding Beta Pictoris, which has been imaged frequently. [ 8 ]

Denebola luminosity

denebola luminosity

Denebola shows a strong infrared excess , which means there must be a debris disk of cool dust in orbit around it. [ 7 ] As our solar system is believed to have formed out of such a disk, Denebola and similar stars such as Vega and Beta Pictoris may be good candidate locations for extrasolar planets . The dust surrounding Denebola has a temperature of about 120 K (−153 °C). Unsuccessful attempts have been made to image the dust disk, implying that the disk contains much less material than that surrounding Beta Pictoris, which has been imaged frequently. [ 8 ]

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